Description: Cytopreparation: Principles and Practice by Gary W. Gill fills a long-standing need for an easy-to-use and authoritative manual on the fundamentals of cytopreparation up-to-and- including microscopy, screening, and data analysis. The text describes in phenomenological terms the most common materials and methods of specimen collection through mounting for gyn, non-gyn, and FNA specimens, as well as the underlying mechanistic bases. The author provides his expertise and information that will empower and enable readers to review and improve their laboratories’ cytopreparatory techniques as they apply to the vast majority of specimens. This unique volume provides facts that are not readily available anywhere. Cytopreparation: Principles & Practice is intended for everyone associated with, and involved in, making cytologic preparations that are useful for their intended purpose. It will serve as a valuable reference tool for educators in cytology and histology, cytotechnology and histotechnology students, cytotechnologists, cytopreparatory technicians, cytopathologists, anatomical/clinical pathologists, pathology residents and cytopathology fellows.

Additional Info

  • File Name Cytopreparation Principles Practice 2013
  • Edition 1st
  • Year 2007
  • Author(s) Gary W. Gill
  • ASIN B01K0SF1IW
  • Size 5.23 MB
  • File Format .pdf
  • Password bioscience.pk

Description: Based on Lever's Histopathology of the Skin, Second Edition, this full-color atlas presents an algorithmic pattern recognition approach to differential diagnosis of skin diseases. Whereas Lever's classifies diseases by pathogenesis, this atlas aids in differential diagnosis of unknown cases by classifying diseases morphologically, based on their location in the skin and the patterns and cell types seen through the microscope. Within each morphologic category, prototypic disorders are described and illustrated with full-color photomicrographs, and a list of differential diagnostic possibilities is presented. The atlas contains over 1,300 full-color illustrations.

Additional Info

  • File Name Atlas and Synopsis of Lever's Histopathology of the Skin 2nd Edition - 2007
  • Edition 2nd
  • Year 2007
  • Author(s) David E. Elder, Rosalie Elenitsas, Bernett L. Johnson Jr. MD, Michael Ioffreda, Jeffrey Miller MD, O. Fred Miller III MD
  • Size 44 MB
  • File Format .pdf
  • Password bioscience.pk
23 Apr 2016
An acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody test is used to help diagnose myasthenia gravis (MG) and to distinguish it from other conditions that may cause similar symptoms, such as chronic muscle fatigue and weakness.
 
AchR antibodies hinder the action of acetylcholine, a chemical (neurotransmitter) that transmits messages between nerve cells. The antibodies do this in three major ways:
  • "Binding" antibodies attach to the acetylcholine receptors on nerve cells and may initiate an inflammatory reaction that destroys them.
  • "Blocking" antibodies may sit on the receptors, preventing acetylcholine from binding.
  • "Modulating" antibodies may cross-link the receptors, causing them to be taken up into the muscle cell and removed from the neuromuscular junction.
Three different types of tests are available to determine which of these may be the problem in a particular individual. However, the test that measures "binding" antibodies is most commonly used because it is generally rare for the other two tests to be positive without the "binding" test being positive as well. These other tests may be used when a doctor strongly suspects myasthenia gravis and the "binding" test is negative.
 
One or more of the AChR antibody tests may be ordered as part of a panel of tests that may also include a striated muscle antibody test to help establish a diagnosis. Depending upon results, an anti-MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) antibody test may also be ordered. The AChR antibody test may be ordered initially as a baseline test and then as indicated to evaluate MG disease activity and/or response to therapy.
 
People with MG often have an enlarged thymus gland and may have thymomas (typically benign tumors of the thymus). Located under the breastbone, the thymus is an active part of the immune system during childhood but normally becomes less active after puberty. If a thymoma is detected, such as during a chest computed tomography (CT) scan done for a different reason, then an AChR antibody test may sometimes be used to determine whether the person has developed these antibodies.
 
When is it ordered?
The AChR antibody test may be ordered when a person has symptoms that suggest MG, such as:
  • Drooping eyelid
  • Double vision
  • Decreased eye movement control
  • Difficulty swallowing, chewing, with choking, drooling and gagging
  • Slurred speech
  • Weak neck muscles
  • Trouble holding up head
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Difficulty walking and an altered gait
  • Specific muscle weakness but normal feelings/sensations
  • Muscle weakness that worsens with sustained effort and improves with rest
When a person has been diagnosed with MG, an AChR antibody test may be ordered occasionally to evaluate MG disease activity and/or response to therapy.
 
An AChR antibody test may sometimes be ordered when a thymoma is detected.
 
What does the test result mean?
AChR antibodies are not normally present in the blood. They are autoantibodies and their presence indicates an autoimmune response.
 
If a person has AChR antibodies and symptoms of MG, then it is likely that the person has this condition.
 
AChR antibodies may be seen with some thymomas, in people who are being treated with drugs such as penicillamine, with some small cell lung cancers, with autoimmune liver disease, and with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (a condition associated with interference with the release of acetylcholine from the nerve ending).
 
A negative test result does not rule out MG. Up to 50% of those with ocular MG (affecting only eye-related muscles) and about 10-15% of those with generalized MG will be negative for AChR antibodies.
 
In general, the greater the quantity of AChR antibody, the more likely a person is to have significant symptoms, but the test results cannot be used to evaluate the severity of symptoms in a specific person.

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