05, Apr, 2018
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What’s anal sex? Safety and Health Risks of Anal Sex

Written by on Thursday, 05 April 2018 15:08
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What’s anal sex? Safety and Health Risks of Anal Sex What’s anal sex? Safety and Health Risks of Anal Sex

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  • Dayyal Dg.
  • Published: 05, Apr, 2018 | Updated: May 22, 2018
  • Sexual Health
What’s anal sex? Safety and Health Risks of Anal Sex

Anal sex refers to the activity in which penis is inserted into the anus. Some people found anal sex more joyful, but the fact is that the practice has the downside and it contains so many health risks.

It is prohibited in various cultures especially with regard to religious prohibition. It is a criminal offense in some countries and punishable by corporal or capital punishments. By disparity, people regard it a valid and natural form of sexual activity.

Is Anal Sex Safe?

There are so many health risks associated with the anal sex and anal intercourse, for both partners. Some of the health risks which may affect both homosexual and heterosexual couples are listed below.

Risk of bacterial infection: E. coli is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacteria, that is commonly found in the lower intestine. Anal sex increases the risk of transmission of E. coli bacteria from anal to your penis, which may cause a severe type of urinary tract infection.

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E. coli may cause many bacterial infections, including, urinary tract infection (UTI), meningitis, cholecystitis, cholangitis, bacteremia, and pneumonia.

Hepatitis A Virus (HAV): Hepatitis A Virus can transmit by the oral sex (anal licking). HAV causes jaundice. It is usually not a life-threatening virus but may cause illness.

Hepatitis C Virus (HCV): It may be transmitted through the anal intercourse. Hepatitis C Virus is the cause of fetal liver chronic disease. It is a life-threatening virus and may lead to death.

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV): It may be transmitted through the anal intercourse and may cause to the anal wart. A research showed that some of the strain of HPV have carcinogenic potential. Some strains of HPV cause cancer of the cervix in women and also cause cancer of the throat.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV): There is a greater risk of transmission of HIV through anal intercourse. It is a life-threatening virus and leads to death.

Weakening of the anal sphincter: The anal anus is enclosed by the ring-like muscle, called the anal sphincter. The main function of anal sphincter is to hold the feces until you get to the toilet. After the excretion of feces, it tightens. Penetration of something like a penis inside the anal can be difficult and painful. Anal intercourse may lead to the weakening of the sphincter muscles, and make it hard to hold the feces.

Lack of natural lubrication: Naturally, the anal is not made for sex. The anal has lack of lubricant as vagina have, which makes the penetration harder and painful. Penetration can tear the tissues inside the anal and cause the wound, allowing viruses and bacteria to easily enter the bloodstream. Somehow, usage of oil or other lubricants can help in preventing the tearing of tissues inside the anal but doesn't completely.

A research showed that risk of transmission of HIV and HPV is much higher in anal sex and compared to the vaginal sex.

How to Prevent Anal Sex Problems

There is no way to completely eliminate the risk factors of anal sex until you avoid the anal sex. However, you can reduce the risk by the following tips.

  1. Always use a condom during anal sex.
  2. Do not enter penis into the mouth after inserting it into the anal.
  3. Use a sufficient amount of lubricants when penetrating into the anal to reduce the risk of tissue tear. Always use water-based lubricants with condoms.
  4. Do not lick the anal as it may cause the transmission of bacteria and viruses.
  5. Take a warm bath before anal sex.
  6. Lying on your stomach will make the insertion easier.
  7. Stop if you feel so much pain during anal sex.
  8. Stop if you experience bleeding or discharge coming from it, go to the hospital as soon as possible.
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Additional Info

  • Story Source:
    • Columbia University's Health Q & A Internet Service, Go Ask Alice: "Pain from anal sex, and how to prevent it."
    • University of California, Santa Barbara, SexInfo Online: "What Are the Dangers of Anal Sex?"
    • News Release, International Microbicides Conference.
    • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign McKinley Health Center: "Anal Sex: Questions and Answers."
Last modified on Tuesday, 22 May 2018 23:15
Read 779 times
  • Dayyal Dg.
  • Clinical laboratory professional specialized to external quality assessment (proficiency testing) schemes for Laboratory medicine and clinical pathology. Author/Writer/Blogger

Dayyal Dg.

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Clinical laboratory professional specialized to external quality assessment (proficiency testing) schemes for Laboratory medicine and clinical pathology. Author/Writer/Blogger

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